Headlines: October 31, 2017

Last chance to enroll in winter farm share! Delivery begins the first week of December and enrollment is about to close. Don't delay. Follow one of these links already:

Our pigs want your pumpkins! Do you have any un-carved pumpkins leftover from your holiday decor? Make a herd of pigs squeal with delight and bring them to 1600 Tarrytown or Hillcrest Farmer's Market on one of the following dates:

  • Tarrytown- Monday Nov 6 or Nov 27 before 4 pm
  • Hillcrest Farmer's Market- Saturday Nov 11 or Dec 2 from 8a-12p

Gourd, pumpkins, and squashes of all kinds are welcome as long as they are intact. A little paint or soft spots are okay. A good rule of thumb is if you don't want to handle it, the pigs don't want to eat it.

Turkeys are sold out! 

Holiday gifts. This year we have Gift Certificates, Tshirts, bandanas, and hand carved kitchen spoons available for preorder and delivery by black Friday. Keep an eye on the webshop or email Katie for more details.

Headlines: Oct 16, 2017

Now is the time to enroll in farm share. Delivery begins the first week of December an enrollment closes at the end of this month. Don't delay. Follow these links to sign up: Winter Full Share or Winter Half Share

Farm Day is cancelled for this year. We hope to reschedule during a lovely, quiet time in Spring. If you would like to schedule a private tour of the farm for your people, drop us a line, we're happy to show you around!

Turkeys available but limited. Nearly all of our birds are spoken for however, we will have a tiny handful of whole birds available first to shareholders and then to the general public. They will be $7/lb due at pickup. Join the waiting list by emailing Katie@farmgirlfood.com

Not-Meat available for Holiday gifts. This year we have Gift Certificates, Tshirts, bandanas, hand carved kitchen spoons all available for preorder and delivery by black Friday. Keep an eye on the webshop or email Katie for more details.

The boring stuff

Early the other morning, I was looking at Instagram, as we all do (right?!), and one of the farms I follow broke the romantic seal of Instagram with a "truth" post. These are the kind where we farmers talk about how hard it is to make ends meet despite long hours and abundant heart, or when all the machinery breaks on the same day, or the big flood/fire/storm that throws all the pieces in the air. Amy Shliffe of Blue Whistler Farm in Durham, NC found herself picking out animal pictures to post while she pumped gas and realized she should share the reality of how she spends her time "farming"- driving. 

The life of the animals is, in reality, about as romantic as the Instagram posts. They really do enjoy the sunsets, the camaraderie, and the lush pastures pretty much all the time. But your farmers do a lot that is decidedly less photo-worthy to make that life of leisure into a livelihood. I was inspired by Amy's post, mostly because there was no disaster to report, it wasn't a particularly exciting break from the lovely critter life, just the normal, mundane thing she does that makes the rest possible. In that vein, here are some of the mundane things I have been doing the last week that keep the wind in the sails of our jaunty little ship. Like Amy, this mostly means driving.

A parade of storms

Working outside, especially in a field where so much depends on the living thing around us, the weather is everything. We have been grateful to enjoy a milder than usual summer with plenty of regular rain. As the heat has begun to reach triple digits these last few weeks, there has been a merciful parade of afternoon showers to help the critters, the forages, and the farmers refresh. Friday's storm spent a lot of time warning of its approach with booming, rolling thunder and blustery, cool wind, giving me a chance to finally catch a time-lapse of these lovely and dramatic summer showers. Enjoy!

Basics: How to Cook Link Sausages

Knackwurst are one of our most favorite sausages with the gentle mix of traditional German spices and a natural casing that pops to perfectly when you bite into it. But sometimes links like these can come out crumbly, weep out all their fat, or have split casings. This is how we cook ours for that great brat experience every time.

Start with completely defrosted sausages and an oven-safe skillet on medium high heat. Also preheat your oven to 375 degrees

Start with completely defrosted sausages and an oven-safe skillet on medium high heat. Also preheat your oven to 375 degrees

Sear your sausages on all sides

Sear your sausages on all sides

Pop the whole pan in the hot oven for exactly 7 minutes and Ta Da! Perfect links!

Pop the whole pan in the hot oven for exactly 7 minutes and Ta Da! Perfect links!